2014 – Upcoming

> Publications intro
> 2014 – Upcoming
> 2006 – 2013

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Upcoming work

Creative Transcestors: Trans* Portraiture Hirstory, from Snapshots to Sculpture. Companion to Feminist Art Practice and Theory. Book Chapter.

Excerpt:

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Puncture Wounds. Sensing Gender Non-Conformity Stigma in the Portrait. Perverse Assemblages: Queer Heteronormative Order Inter/Medially. Book Chapter.

Excerpt:

PDF Forthcoming

 

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Towards Trans Cinema. Routledge Companion to Cinema and Gender. Book Chapter.

Excerpt:

PDF Forthcoming

 

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Representing Trans* Sexualities. Routledge Companion to Media, Sex and Sexuality. Book Chapter.

Excerpt:22. Image_TRANS-GRRRLS
This chapter disentangles the web of terms that knots together the medical naming of transsexualism, the mediatized practices of trans sex, and what might today be recognized as the multiplicities of trans* sexualities. Carla A. Pfeffer has named trans sexualities ‘a lacuna’ in theorizations of sexuality and desire (2014: 598). For a growing number of (trans) scholars, trans sexualities, sex, and their mediatized representations are vital academic and political concerns. Trans sex and sexuality reveals the myriad ways in which gender and sexuality are interdependent and mutually constitutive, moving forward studies of gender and sexuality in practice, in policy, and even philosophically. Close analysis of erotic (self-) representations brings to light the possibility of experiencing both sexual fluidity and stability, resolving a long-standing impasse in feminist and queer approaches to sexuality (Steinbock 2011). In this chapter I will focus on two domains that provide insight into the cultural shifts around how trans sexualities are mediatized: transfeminine activism in queer pornography and, by way of conclusion, some notes on news coverage of how to talk about trans sex.”
PDF Forthcoming

 

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2016

 

INTER*me: An Inter-loculation on the Body in Photography (with Del LaGrace Volcano and Jay Prosser). Transgender and Intersex in the Arts, Science, and Society. Book Chapter.

Excerpt:

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Misogyny. Keywords for Radicals: The Contested Vocabulary of Late Capitalist Struggle. Book Chapter.

Excerpt:21. Image_manspreading cartoon
Activists today must consider analytics beyond two neat camps of “perpetrator” and “victim” aligned respectively with “men” and “women.” Misogyny’s critical purchase arises from its ability to identify the injustices endured as a result of disparaged femininity and to acknowledge how these injustices are experienced differentially by white women, women of color, homosexual men, sissy, faerie, or fag identified people, transvestie, trans women, femmes, and queens. In contrast, popular usages of “misogyny” continue their struggle to determine what a woman is. This tension makes misogyny a key term for radicals to consider as we respond to the hate coursing through patriarchal, racist, and capitalist relations.”
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Trans. Sources, Perspectives Methodologies. Macmillan Interdisciplinary Handbooks: Gender volume 1. Book Chapter.

Excerpt:20. Image_Transfeminism
“The term trans is a word-forming element. The original meaning, in Latin, is “across, beyond, through, on the other side of, to go beyond,” with the prefixal meaning of crossing (trans-Atlantic), changing (transformation), or between (transracial). What are the stakes of invoking a term that both invites and confounds oppositional thinking (male–female, masculine–feminine) in the context of feminist debates on the “sex/gender system” and the “heterosexual matrix”? Trans has the power to create new sets of vocabulary that are sensitive to emergence and processual transitioning; hence, trans goes beyond sex change ways of thinking that are entrenched in binary switches. In gender studies, trans is a key term that derives from discussions on self and group identity, that revises medical nomenclature like transsexual and transvestite, and that articulates political demands for groups like Global Action for Trans* Empowerment. Shifting from a prefix to an adjective, in this chapter, trans also qualifies a person by describing, naming, or modifying their gender identity. … This chapter considers trans as it intersects with debates in feminism and queer theory by successively exploring the ways in which it functions as a linguistic modifier of gender concepts, performs as a subject of analysis, and constitutes a field of studies.”
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“Look!” But also, “Touch!”: Theorizing Images of Trans-Eroticism Beyond a Politics of Visual Essentialism. Porno-graphics and Porno-tactics: Desire, Affect and Representation in Pornography. Book Chapter.

Excerpt:19. Image.OutoftheWoods
Following Stone’s suggestion to look at instances of trans sexual dissonance, I argue for special attention to be paid to the ways in which the conflicting imperatives of “Look! No, don’t!” are negotiated in public confessions of trans sexualities. Within trans pornography, where genitals are often on display, or at least the exposure of them is negotiated, we can examine the complicated political demand to look at this public confession of trans embodiment, but also the sexual invitation to touch it. Trans pornography may cite the identity politics of visibility, but it also offers a rich opportunity for investigating the force, shape, and experience of trans eroticism through touch.”
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The Somatechnics of Willfulness. Review of Willful Subjects by Sara Ahmed. Krisis Journal for Contemporary Philosophy. Book Review.

Excerpt:18. Image_WillfulSubjects
Ahmed’s latest contribution to feminist ‘not philosophy’ is an assemblage of heterodox readings of continental philosophy and literature that incorporates insights from cultural theory, queer and black feminist studies. She explains that the book contributes to ‘not’ philosophy not only through a non-philosopher engaging the novelist George Elliot as a philosopher (though she is “not”), but also by attending to “the not” in order to make it an object of thought (15). ‘Willfulness might be what we do when we are judged as being not, as not meeting the criteria for being human,’ writes Ahmed, succinctly parsing the main thrust of her explorations in the archive of ‘not being white, not being male, not being straight, not being able-bodied’ (Ibid.) As such, Willful Subjects greatly expands on the figure of the feminist killjoy introduced in Ahmed’s The Promise of Happiness (Duke, 2010); it even claims to be readable as a prequel by returning to characters, texts and the question of conditional sociality (see p. 219 n42). By figuring the stray, and doing philosophy astray, Ahmed’s writing stridently affirms the negative “not” within philosophy’s discipline.
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2015

 

Disfiguration: On Violence and Negativity in Queer Art. Pink Labour on Golden Streets: Queer Art Practices. Book Chapter.

Excerpt:17. Image_gesso.Disfiguration
I’m concerned less with the ethics of committing violence, whether real or imagined; in other words, asking should you or should you not act violently. I am more interested in the political nature of art that is explicitly about bashing back. However, I want to extend the scope of imagined violence to artworks that are nonrepresentational and distance themselves from being figural representations of a violent story. Hence, what I focus my analysis on is how negativity becomes abstracted in the painting and performance of bodily violence. How does negativity become condensed into a nasty prick felt on a viewer’s nervous system, or more strongly, a disfiguring affect?”
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Taking it Lying Down: On the Labour of Gender Non-Compliance in Doran George’s Live Art. Queer Dramaturgies: International Perspectives on Where Performance Leads Queer. Book Chapter.

Excerpt:
remnants“On 9 June 2001, Doran George spent a workday in a large emptied store within a shopping centre located at the heart of London’s Elephant and Castle district in the UK. This area south of London city proper usually has the connotation of being a not desirable area; it has been largely a rundown working class and immigrant neighbourhood though also the historic site of theatres. On a global scale, this moment is shortly pre-9/11, less than a decade before the world recession, and, more locally, fifty years post-renewal following the district’s destruction during the Second World War. In the intervening years the locale had changed its notoriety from a consumerist space of prostitution to a massive shopping centre, the first of its kind in the United Kingdom. The commercial space George took over for the day was thusly converted into a performance space, shifting the register from buying and selling to enacting. My approach to this performance is to ask in what ways does its various components make concrete, or localise, the time and place of its actions, affects, and political gestures within the ever-expanding space of neo-liberal economic orders? Against the backdrop of globalizing tendencies that leverage the masses into the precariat, what can this performance teach us about shifting registers and political allegiances?'”
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Screenshot 2015-10-21 10.22.21Een eind aan de stigmatisering: Steinbock wil met haar onderzoek de mindset van mensen veranderen. Leidsch Dagblad Wednesday 14 October. Media Interview.

Excerpt:
“Hoewel de positie van transgender mensen in de samenleving is verbeterd, is er nog steeds sprake van stigmatisering. ‘Ik hoop die met mijn onderzoek in beeld te kunnen brengen en duidelijk maken dat stigmatizering niet alleen een probleem is voor transgender mensen’, aldus cultureel wetenschapper Eliza Steinbock.”
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Screenshot 2015-10-21 10.07.08Man, Vrouw, of X. Volkskrant Vonk Saturday 3 October. Media Interview.  

Excerpt:
“Een man de vrouw word of een vrouw man: alla. Maar het grooste deel van de transgenders is niet in een man/vrouwhokje in te delen. Voor de transgender die tussen de seksen in zit, is weinig begrip.”
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Parsing Affective Economies of Race, Sexuality, and Gender: The Case of ‘Nasty Love’. Structures of Feeling: Affectivity and the Study of Culture. Book Chapter.

1. Image_knife_ParsingExcerpt:
“In this chapter, I wish to show how transgender studies and affect studies might mutually approach the subject as a matter of process. I outline an affirmative constructivist ontology of ‘becoming more’ to oppose the current trend in queer theory towards deconstruction and negation. Scholars in transgender and affect studies often share the methodology of departing from the middle, starting with describing the affective relation that generates a subject. For example, in “Happy Objects” (2010) Sara Ahmed writes that affect “is what sticks, or what sustains or preserves the connection between ideas, values, and objects” (29). Ahmed suggests elsewhere (2004) that “emotions play a crucial role in the ‘surfacing’ of individual and collective bodies” namely through the circulation patterns they carve out between bodies and signs (117). Wherever affect streams, it produces an exchange economy. Focusing on the creation of boundaries, Ahmed (2004) also grants a creative and redistributive quality to affective economies – “emotions do things” (119). I argue that in a case of trans pornography the charged affective economy of relations between ‘nasty’ race, sexuality, and gender work to refunction damaging stereotypes; and to proliferate new aggregates of ideas, values, and objects stuck together by ‘nasty love.'”
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2014

 

Generative Negatives: Del LaGrace Volcano’s Herm Body photographs. TSQ: Transgender Studies Quarterly issue “Trans* Cultural Production”. Article.

2. Image_ back_ GenerativeExcerpt:
“The generativity of the Polaroid 665 negative in Volcano’s hands is not purely photographic; it is also affective. The artist appreciates the symbolic dimension of the unusual process and exploits it, explaining “I used Polaroid negative/positive film to mirror my feelings about my embodiment.” (Volcano 2012). What are the stakes, and what are the consequences, of a (photographic) negative generating and reflecting the artist’s self-image?”
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3. image_ Homage_PhotographicPhotographic Flashes: On Imaging Trans Violence in Heather Cassils’ Durational Art. Photography & Culture issue “Queering Photography”. Article.

Excerpt:
“Cassils’ recent work opens up a set of questions relevant to the study of gender variant and queer visual cultures: Does a trans body experienced as a punctum (a detail or intensity of time that pricks the viewer) indicate queer anxieties? What is the temporality of photographic violence? How can the body’s resiliency be pictured? The essay advances by tracking intersecting violences in Cassils’ Cuts and Becoming An Image, and then concludes with a consideration of bodybuilding as a model for understanding the dual nature of violence’s generative-destructive powers.”
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4. Image_ Tobi_pornographyPornography. TSQ: Transgender Studies Quarterly issue “Postposttransexual: Terms for a 21st Century”. Article.

Excerpt:
“Hard core is hard work. The political strategy of countering stereotyped images with more diverse images of trans sexuality has been championed by various organizations: Adult Video News Awards acknowledged the pioneering work of Buck Angel and Allanah Starr; the Feminist Porn Awards honors trans* and genderqueer performers like Drew Deveaux and Jiz Lee; and the Berlin Porn Film Festival actively supports trans (post)pornographies. Film directors focusing on trans sexuality from within the community include Christopher Lee, Hans Scheirl, Cary Cronenwett, Tobaron Waxman, Morty Diamond, T-wood team, and Tobi Hill-Meyer.”
PDF [1200 KB]

 

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On The Affective Force of ‘Nasty Love’. Journal of Homosexuality issue “Trans Sexualities”. Article.

5. Image_ Interview_Affective forceExcerpt:
“Tackling the mimetic logic of sex-gender that limits the transsexual subject’s sexuality into seeming a poor representation, the author argues that trans pornography and autoethnographic accounts from trans scholars emphasize the affective dimension of trans sex, a material remainder absent from mimetic theories of sexuality. Developing concepts from Alfred North Whitehead’s process philosophy, in tandem with Morty Diamond’s film Trans Entities: The Nasty Love of Papí and Wil (2007) and a selection of trans theorists, this article elaborates on the horizon of affective potential opened by transgender, brown, kinky, and pornographic “nastiness.” The event of “nasty love” solicits a differential becoming, growing the edge of self.”
PDF [1900 KB]

 

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